The next major step in the peace process at the end of the American Civil War was the handover of General Joseph E. Johnston and his armies to Major General William T. Sherman on April 26, 1865, at Bennett Place in Durham, North Carolina. [19] Johnston`s army of Tennessee was part of nearly one hundred thousand surrendered Confederate soldiers from North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. [19] The terms of the surrender were in a document entitled “Terms of a Military Convention,” signed by Sherman, Johnston, and Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant in Raleigh, North Carolina. [20] In the days following the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, high-level officers were increasingly concerned about security. Hancock sent Brigadier General George Chapman, a Union cavalry officer, in his place to consult Mosby on April 18. Mosby was still not ready to surrender and asked for an extension of the truce by 48 hours. Chapman agreed and informed Mosby that the ceasefire would last until noon on April 20.

Hancock refused to ask Mosby for 10 more days until Mosby could know the fate of Johnston`s army. Since not everyone was in the mood yet to capitulate, Halleck went on to say that those who did not surrender would be treated as prisoners of war. He finished the telegram with one exception: “Guerrilla leader Mosby will not be pardoned.” Lee and Grant appointed three officers to ensure that the terms of the capitulation were properly executed. On April 26, 1865, under his leadership, General Johnston relinquished the following commands: the Department of Tennessee and Georgia; army of Tennessee; the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida; and the Department of North Carolina and South Virginia. [24] Johnston Sherman counted about 30,000 men. [23] On April 27, his adjutant of the Army of Tennessee announced the conditions in the General Order #18, and on May 2, he gave his farewell address to the Army of Tennessee as the General Order #22. [25] The remaining parts of Florida`s “Western Brigade” surrendered with the rest of Johnston`s forces on May 4, 1865, to Greensboro, North Carolina. [19] After the fall of Richmond, the stead of the Confederates, on April 2, 1865, Confederate government officials, including President Jefferson Davis, fled. The dominoes began to fall. Appomattox`s surrender took place a week later, on April 9. Sherman told Grant and Stanton that “I will accept the same conditions that General Grant gave to General Lee and that I will be careful not to complicate the points of civil policy.” One of the topics Lee discussed before the terms were concluded and signed was the topic of horses.

He pointed out that, unlike the Federals, Confederate cavalerists and gunners owned their own horses in his army. Grant said he would not include it in the deal, but would order his officials, who received the suspended sentences, to let the men bring their animals home. . . .